An overview of an embedded system and its advantages and disadvantages

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An overview of an embedded system and its advantages and disadvantages

Emergence of embedded systems The computers used to control equipment, otherwise known as embedded systems, have been around for about as long as computers themselves. They were first used back in the late s in communications to control electromechanical telephone switches.

Nov 18,  · Advantages disadvantages of embedded operating system? An RTOS is not required for an embedded system but it can offer powerful advantages to the system developer. Embedded System. As its name suggests, Embedded means something that is attached to another thing. An embedded system can be thought of as a computer hardware system having software embedded in it. An embedded system can be an independent system or it can be a part of a large system. Disadvantages of embedded operating systemsSome projects require the power and versatility of high-end operating systems, but such systems also have.

As the computer industry has moved toward ever smaller systems over the past decade or so, embedded systems have moved along with it, providing more capabilities for these tiny machines.

Increasingly, these embedded systems need to be connected to some sort of network, and thus require a networking stack, which increases the complexity level and requires more memory and interfaces, as well as, you guessed it, the services of an operating system.

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Off-the-shelf operating systems for embedded systems began to appear in the late s, and today several dozen viable options are available. The popular "back-to-basics" approach of Linux, which makes it easier and more flexible to install and administer than UNIX, is an added advantage for UNIX gurus who already appreciate the operating system because it has many of the same commands and programming interfaces as traditional UNIX.

The typical shrink-wrapped Linux system has been packaged to run on a PC, with a hard disk and tons of memory, much of which is not needed on an embedded system.

A fully featured Linux kernel requires about 1 MB of memory. However, the Linux micro-kernel actually consumes very little of this memory, only K on a Pentium CPU, including virtual memory and all core operating system functions. With the networking stack and basic utilities, a complete Linux system runs quite nicely in K of memory on an Intel microprocessor, with an 8-bit bus SX.

Another benefit of using an open source operating system like Embedded Linux over a traditional real-time operating system RTOSis that the Linux development community tends to support new IP and other protocols faster than RTOS vendors do.

For example, more device drivers, such as network interface card NIC drivers and parallel and serial port drivers, are available for Linux than for commercial operating systems.

An overview of an embedded system and its advantages and disadvantages

Flash memory Flash RAM is a special kind of memory that most Palm devices use to store the operating system. It has the advantage of allowing operating system upgrades, and it is also used in digital cellular phones, digital cameras, LAN switches, PC cards, digital set top boxes, embedded controllers, and other small devices.

An embedded system, like Embedded Linux, does not require a disk drive, although a number of other memory organizations are possible.

An overview of an embedded system and its advantages and disadvantages

The core Linux operating system itself has a fairly simple micro-kernel architecture. Networking and file systems are layered on top of the micro-kernel in modular fashion. Drivers and other features can be either compiled in or added to the kernel at run-time as loadable modules.

This provides a highly modular building-block approach to constructing a custom embeddable system, which typically uses a combination of custom drivers and application programs to provide the added functionality.

Embedded Linux applications: An overview

An embedded system also often requires generic capabilities, which, in order to avoid re-inventing the wheel, are built with off-the-shelf programs and drivers, many of which are available for common peripherals and applications.

Linux can run on most microprocessors with a wide range of peripherals and has a ready inventory of off-the-shelf applications. Linux is also well-suited for embedded Internet devices, because of its support of multiprocessor systems, which lends it scalability.

This capability gives a designer the option of running a real-time application on a dual processor system, increasing total processing power.

So you can run a Linux system on one processor while running a GUI, for example, simultaneously on another processor.

Embedded Systems Overview

The one disadvantage to running Linux on an embedded system is that the Linux architecture provides real-time performance through the addition of real-time software modules that run in the kernel space, the portion of the operating system that implements the scheduling policy, hardware-interrupts exceptions and program execution.

An off-the-shelf RTOS, on the other hand, is designed from the ground up for real-time performance, and provides reliability through allocating certain processes a higher priority than others when launched by a user as opposed to by system-level processes.Increasingly, these embedded systems need to be connected to some sort of network, and thus require a networking stack, which increases the complexity level and requires more memory and interfaces, as well as, you guessed it, the services of an operating system.

In this week, we start with an overview of operating systems and embedded operating systems for IoT.

Disadvantages of embedded Operating system Share on Facebook An embedded system is a type of computer that is only designed to perform specific tasks and is difficult if not impossible to reprogram.
Emergence of embedded systems Difficult to transfer data from one system to other Examples of Embedded operating system:
Embedded System Important features of an embedded operating system? An embedded operating system is an operating system for embedded computer systems.
Embedded Systems Overview Next Page System A system is an arrangement in which all its unit assemble work together according to a set of rules.

Primary functionalities of embedded operating systems are discussed. We learn how operating systems work: how memory is managed, how tasks are scheduled, what interrupts are and how they are handled.

What are advantages and disadvantages of embedded operating system

and its advantages and disadvantages. AN OVERVIEW OF EMBEDDED SELF-TEST DESIGN A report by Gaurav Gulati Ryan Fonnesbeck embedded directly into the system hardware, the testing process has the The advantages of BIST outweigh its disadvantages.

As a result, BIST is. Once an embedded system is deployed (or finalized), it will be difficult to change its configuration - both its hardware and software.

Remote update of software is possible provided the capability is included. system that automatically tests the system by applying certain test stimulus and observing the corresponding system response. Because the test framework is embedded directly into the system hardware, the testing process has the potential of being faster and more economical than using an external test setup.

Nov 18,  · Advantages disadvantages of embedded operating system? An RTOS is not required for an embedded system but it can offer powerful advantages to the system developer.

The Advantages of an Embedded System | timberdesignmag.com