The long search for my identity and origins

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The long search for my identity and origins

The red-hair gene is most common in among Scottish and Irish people. Although the history that used to be taught at school said the Irish were a Celtic people who had migrated from central Europe, the latest studies of Irish DNA tell us a very different story.

A Search For Identity

Research done into the DNA of the Irish has shown that our old understanding of where the population of Ireland originated may have been misguided. The modern Irish population share many genetic similarities with Scottish and Welsh populations, and to a lesser extent the English.

At the same time, DNA testing of remains of ancient Irish people suggests that some of the earliest human arrivals on the island originally came from much further afield. This article is based on the research available in early - however new discoveries are being published regularly so if you want to keep up-to-date on this topic make sure you check online scientific journals such as Nature.

Medieval map of Ireland, showing Irish tribes. There are still remnants of their presence scattered across the island. Mountsandel in Coleraine in the North of Ireland is the oldest known site of settlement in Ireland—remains of woven huts, stone tools and food such as berries and hazelnuts were discovered at the site in For a long time the myth of Irish history has been that the Irish are Celts.

Many people still refer to Irish, Scottish, and Welsh as Celtic culture. Keltoi was the name given by the Ancient Greeks to a 'barbaric' in their eyes people who lived to the north of them in central Europe. While early Irish art shows some similarities of style to central European art of the Keltoi, historians have also recognized many significant differences between the two cultures.

Recent research into Irish DNA at the beginning of the twenty-first century suggests that the early inhabitants of Ireland were not directly descended from the Keltoi of central Europe. Genome sequencing performed on remains of early settlers in Ireland by researchers at Trinity University in Dublin and Queens University has revealed at least two waves of migration to the island in past millennia.

Analysis of the remains of a 5, year-old Irish farmer suggested that the population of Ireland at that time was closely genetically related to the modern-day populations of southern Europe, especially Spain and Sardinia.

Her ancestors, however, originally migrated from the Middle East, the cradle of agriculture. Meanwhile, the research team also examined the remains of three 4, year-old men from the Bronze Age and revealed that another wave of migration to Ireland had taken place, this time from the edges of Eastern Europe.

One third of their ancestry came from the Steppe region of Russia and Ukraine, so their ancestors must have gradually spread west across Europe. These remains, found on Rathlin Island also shared a close genetic affinity with the Scottish, Welsh, and modern Irish, unlike the earlier farmer.

This suggests that many people living in Ireland today have genetic links to people who were living on the island at least 4, years ago. It tells a semi-mythical history of the waves of people who settled in Ireland in earliest times. It says the first settlers to arrive in Ireland were a small dark people called the Fir Bolg, followed by a magical super-race called the Tuatha de Danaan the people of the goddess Dana.

Most interestingly, the book says that the group which then came to Ireland and fully established itself as rulers of the island were the Milesians—the sons of Mil, a soldier from Spain.

Modern DNA research into male Y chromosomes has found that the the R1b haplogroup reaches very high concentrations in Western Ireland and the Basque country in northern Spain.

The long search for my identity and origins

While the picture for matrilineal descent mother to daughter is more complex, it seems that the northern Spanish and the Irish might have common male ancestors at some point in history. There are also interesting cultural similarities along the western seaboard of Europe, stretching from Spain up to Ireland - as has been written about by the archeologist Barry Cunliffe.

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Although it might seem surprising, it is worth remembering that in ancient times the sea was one of the fastest and easiest ways to travel.

When the land was covered in thick forest, coastal settlements were common and people travelled around the seaboard of Europe quite freely. This coincides with the time of the famous Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages, who legend says brought St Patrick to Ireland as a slave.

The O'Neill family, who claim to descend from Niall, have certainly been a powerful family through the ages in Ireland. Meanwhile, the latest research in suggests that the Irish are most closely related to people in North West France Brittany where a Celtic language has traditionally been spoken and in Western Norway.

Interestingly, where earlier studies didn't find much impact of Viking DNA among the modern Irish, a recent study suggests there may have been more influence than perviously thought. You can read more details here: DNA testing of the male Y chromosome has shown that Irish males have the highest incidence of the R1b haplogroup in Europe.

While other parts of Europe have integrated continuous waves of new settlers from the east, Ireland's remote geographical position has meant that the Irish gene-pool has been less susceptible to change.

The same genes have been passed down from parents to children for thousands of years. The other region with very high levels of this male chromosome is the Basque region.

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This is mirrored in genetic studies which have compared DNA analysis with Irish surnames. Many surnames in Irish are Gaelic surnames, suggesting that the holder of the surname is a descendant of people who lived in Ireland long before the English conquests of the Middle Ages.

Men with Gaelic surnames, showed the highest incidences of Haplogroup 1 or Rb1 gene.In Search of Ancient Ireland: The Origins of the Irish from Neolithic Times to the Coming of the English [Carmel McCaffrey, Leo Eaton] on timberdesignmag.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This engaging book traces the history, archaeology, and legends of ancient Ireland from B.C., when nomadic hunter-gatherers appeared in Ireland at the end of the last Ice Age to A.D. A Search For Identity. By John Henrik Clarke (May ) My own search for an identity began—as I think it begins for all young people—a long time ago when I looked at the world around me and tried to understand what it was all about.

A unique and exquisitely wrought story of one multiracial woman’s journey to discover and embrace herself in a family that sought to deny her black heritage, Sil Lai Abrams shares her story in Black Lotus: A Woman’s Search for Racial Identity—an account that will undoubtedly ignite conversation on race, racial identity, and the human experience.

I am having trouble with coming up with how my protagonist acquires his powers. I have the backstory and personality for the most part developed, but HOW he . One of the oldest texts composed in Ireland is the Leabhar Gabhla, the Book of timberdesignmag.com tells a semi-mythical history of the waves of people who settled in Ireland in earliest times.

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